University of Virginia Launches Program to Improve Former Inmates’ Re-entry Into Society

A new program at the University of Virginia will use custom software and apps to address an issue in need of rigorous study and innovative solutions: how to improve recently released inmates’ re-entry into society.

“Two-thirds of released inmates will be re-arrested within three years,” said Jennifer Doleac, assistant professor of public policy and economics. “This high recidivism rate signals our collective failure to help formerly incarcerated individuals build stable lives after prison. By leveraging interactive technologies and behavioral insights, we can provide prisoners with more personalized information and supports during this often-challenging transition, and reduce the probability of recidivism.”

Along with Doleac, Ben Castleman, assistant professor of education and public policy, will lead the program’s research, development, and implementation. Their goal is to help formerly incarcerated individuals build personalized transition plans, reducing the likelihood of recidivism.

Read more about the program

More News Stories

01-28-2020 04:09pm

Fourteen Universities Show How Faculty, Students Can Create Programs That Foster Cooperation Over Conflict

Fourteen universities are joining a new pilot initiative launched by Chicago-based education nonprofit Interfaith Youth Core, bringing together students and faculty on campuses across the country to leverage their diverse beliefs and backgrounds to counter polarization.

Read more

01-16-2020 04:33pm

UCLA Brings Together Engineering and Law Scholars to Study How to Harness Benefits of Emerging Technology

UCLA's new Institute for Technology, Policy, and Law will advance scholarship and address issues at the intersection of technology and the legal system, examining the impact of artificial intelligence, robotics, digital free speech and other new technologies on our society.

Read more

01-15-2020 01:34pm

UNC Citation Project Seeks to Improve Public Safety by Exploring Alternatives to Arrest

The Criminal Justice Innovation Lab (CJIL) at the University of North Carolina (UNC) School of Government recently launched The Citation Project, which aims to improve policing practices through rigorous evaluation of citation in lieu of arrest.

Read more