Saint Francis University Launches National Database on Occupational Regulation

Today, the Center for the Study of Occupational Regulation at Saint Francis University launched a comprehensive online database on occupational licensing regulation that tracks how state regulations impact licensed professionals in the U.S. workforce. The first of its kind, this interactive database will track state regulatory barriers based on occupation, starting with medical professionals such as nurse practitioners, massage therapists, and more.

“Through the utilization and examination of the database, CSOR will aim to enhance public awareness regarding the impact of occupational licensing and encourage more discussion and research on the topic,” said CSOR Director Edward Timmons. “By producing, updating, and maintaining a national database, we hope to inform citizens, policy makers, and other researchers of the extent, scope, and potential negative impacts of these often-debilitating laws.”

Explore the database.

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