Penn Law’s Quattrone Center Announces New Criminal Justice Policy Research

The Quattrone Center for the Fair Administration of Justice at the University of Pennsylvania Law School will launch a new initiative to expand its interdisciplinary, data-driven approach to criminal justice policy research.

The initiative will focus on the causes of crime and the policies that reduce it most effectively, aiming to propose solutions that prevent error and improve fairness in the criminal justice system. Economist and criminal justice scholar Paul Heaton will oversee the initiative.

“Improving the criminal justice system requires the work of scholars from a diverse group of fields, not only law, but also fields such as psychology, sociology, and medicine,” said Heaton. “This new research initiative will allow us to broaden and deepen our study of key areas of criminal justice, while training a new generation of scholars in the field.”


Read more about the Quattrone Center’s work

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