National Institute for Civil Discourse Projects to Provide Models for How to Restore Civility

Though Americans of varying worldviews share a concern over the health of our country’s institutions, the way in which we discuss the topic differs across communities—including academic disciplines. The University of Arizona-based National Institute for Civil Discourse (NICD) aims to bridge those gaps. In a new project announced today, NICD is issuing a request for proposals to scholars with different ideologies and from different disciplines who seek to come together to research the core concepts and institutions that are vital to American political and civic life.

NICD will select 10 scholars for a total of five projects. Each group will receive grants to enable them to conduct research over 15 months and present their findings at events around the country. Additionally, to demonstrate how – and why – researchers of varying backgrounds and beliefs can work together, each grantee group also will write at least one paper that documents how they collaborated.

Read NICD’s full request for proposals here, and read a recent Washington Post article highlighting NICD’s work here.

06-30-2020 01:56pm

Rivet School: Redesigning the college experience for working adults

In the face of COVID-19 — and with $100,000 in philanthropic support from the Charles Koch Foundation — Rivet announced Pay It Forward, a new program that allows students to enroll and pay no tuition during the course of their studies.

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06-29-2020 03:33pm

Cornell’s Yale-Loehr on Supreme Court’s DACA decision

Stephen Yale-Loehr, a law professor at Cornell and a Charles Koch Foundation (CKF) grantee, commented on the DACA decision in several news outlets, including on National Public Radio (NPR), and in The Associated Press, The New York Times and Chicago Tribune.

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College Pulse survey shows students believe online learning could be improved

The Charles Koch Foundation (CKF) and College Pulse have released the results of a new survey showing that while college students were somewhat underwhelmed with higher education’s rapid transition to online learning, they are optimistic that online learning will improve in the future.

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